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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute posted the activists who are part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds
the officials loyal to president bashar al-assad. they renewed it last week to gain control with aleppo. a free syrian army spokesperson says the assad regime mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. he says rebel fighters plan to carry out simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> citizens upset by iran's plummeting currency have taken to the streets of the capital tehran. their protests highlight their growing frustration with the government. protesters fought with riot police in the city's main bazaar. they were demanding the government stop the fall of the rial. demonstrators staged another protest in a different area of the city. iran's currency has lost 70% of the value in the past year and hit record lows against the dollar. u.s. and european sanctions targeting iran are hurting the economy. anti-government protests are unusual in iran. an exchanger at the bazaar said the demonstrators were merchants. >> there have been no reports of injuries, but many shops are closed in and around the bazaar. security officers are patrolling the area. >>> japan's foreign minister
. it's working with the arab league to identify people to help force assad out of power a year after president obama said, we want assad out of power. he has substantive things to talk about on the debate stage when they debate foreign policy in two weeks and that ad is now irrelevant. >> don't you think this is a case of him saying, i'll do the things the president is trying to do but do them more effectively? >> there's a fair case to make and there's an opening for that. >> i agree. i'm not saying that's a bad thing. >> there's an opening the size of a pin drop. he didn't lay out his strategy for peace in israel. on iran, the best he could come up with was, i'm going to get tougher on iran because i'm going to have tougher sanctions. >> when barack obama came to office, he said, i'm not george w. bush, so therefore, i can negotiate with iran. >> he said he would open up all doors but he wasn't going to give you a seat at the table unless you wanted to come and talk peace. >> we have unsolicited advice on the other side of the break including helpful hints for donald trump. stay wi
the hole in the middle of this is what is a post as sad, assad syria going to look at, what is the political and security order of a post assad era on? >> you has mosni on the panel you need to get egypt, iran and others aund the tab. >> it seems me he is right, basically, because all of those four countries have got a buying interest and we have interests as well, so i think we -- >> you don't mind the idea of iran being part of that and saudi arabia? >> they already are a part of it. >> they have dealt themselves in but in a negative way. >> but the united states has not bought into that idea. >> it is very difficult and if you are saying to me what is going to be the thing that in the end find a way through, i haven't yet seen a military plan that has said to me, yes this is a way of protectin ose people. and -- but the threat from the minister in my time said the definition of foreign policy is stopping people from killing each other and i am not seeing governance or intelligence i have not seen an intervention plan that could in the least bit work. >> i am not arguing e
, and children have been massacred by the assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked. the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda, pakistan, afghanistan, including the killing of osama bin laden. these are real achievements one at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force, however, in yemen and somalia, libya, other parts of north africa, iraq, and now in syria, and other extremists have been ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight, but are no substitute for national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding. i want to believe him as much as anyone se. but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region, and with a violent extremists on the march, and with an american ambass
to a ba shall al-assad's regime and there are some more democrat cli inclined shall we say to presumably would want to have a better relationship with the united states with the west and other friendly countries in the middle east, whether saudi arabia or qatar or some of the other countries actively involved in what's going on in syria a. the great concern the obama administration has had and the reason why the u.s. has not sought to arm the rebels is because some of those rebels may be totally opposed to the united states, maybe closer to al qaeda, for example, than to the united states, so once you start arming rebels in a major way, you're not sure where those weapons are going to wind up, and that's been the big concern of the obama administration right now. how do you make sure that the weapons you provide rebels are really going to the good guys as it were as opposed to the potential bad guys and that's not an easy question to answer. >> never. in fact, we have countless examples where this has gone awry. hold the thought for a moment. if you could stand by, i have a lot more ques
of the opposition who share our values and ensure they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks, helicopters and fighter jets. nbc's first read pointing out that reports of cia doing something covertly like this in syria. so something going on as we speak. the u.s. government did this with libya. basically arming the opposition. and you know, your men ri's men ri is only my friend for so long. is that a wise approach? >> no. i have spent time on this issue. there's no doubt providing nonlethal communication support is extraordinary important and secretary clinton announced massive amount of humanitarian assistance and ku dos to the administration for doing that. the real problem here is that there's this struggle within the romney campaign itself over syria between neo-conservatives to militarily intervene and those who actually are more reticent and the problem is that mr. romney flip flops between one group and the other and can't quite decide which one is more important. the bottom line, however, for purposes of american interest in the middle east, arming a rag tag group of
to the regime of syrian president bashar al assad. walid al moualem described that as blatant interference in syria's domestic affairs. >>> north korea's vice foreign minister used a podium at the united nations conference to announce a change of course. pak kil-yon said his country wants to build relations with other countries. he said the united states should change what he called its hostile stance. >> translator: first secretary kim jong-un has opened a door to a new era. we will forge relations with countries that are friendly with us without being bound by the pass. >> north korean officials failed in april to launch what they called a satellite-carrying rocket. the leaders of other countries believe they were trying to test ballistic missile technology. pak accused the u.s. of forcing the security council to condemn the launch. pak said the only way to bring peace to the korean peninsula is for the u.s. to end its hostile policy. and he accused south korean president lee myung-bak of causing inter-korean relations to hit rock bottom. >>> people in japan's northeast are focused on ov
of the west. neither side appears to have made significant gains. president bashar al-assad is said to have ordered thousands of reinforcements to aleppo. >> a mortar bomb has killed five people in a turkish border town. one of the victims was a 6-year- old boy. >> the shell landed on the southeastern border with syria. at least nine others were injured. the turkish foreign minister brief to the u.n. envoy to syria on the attack. a shell hit the same town last friday but there were no deaths. >> for more, we can go to suzanne in istanbul. what more can you tell us about the incident? can we be sure who fired it? >> the turks into be sure because they have already fired back. the prime minister has said they have attacked after determining targets on the syrian site and they said they hit their targets. they have retaliated so for the first time this is a tit-for- tat. so the situation is hot. >> can we expect any more pressure from within turkey for more action? >> absolutely. the prime minister and the foreign minister have been on the phone calling everybody. they especially expect a move
to president bashar al assad. the free syrian army renewed its offensive last week in an effort to win control of aleppo. government forces responded with air strikes. a free syrian army said they mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. rebel fighters plan to carry out more simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> plummeting value of iran's currency has triggered rare street clashes in the capital tehran. the protests jai alai growing public frustration with the government. scores of protesters clashed with riot police in the city's main bazaar on wednesday. they demanded the government stop the rial's plunge. it lost 70% of the value in the last year since economic sanctions were imposed by the united states and europe over iran's nuclear program. it's dipped to record lows against the dollar. a money exchanger who witnessed the protest told nhk by phone that the demonstrators were merchants. >> there are no reports yet of injuries. many shops have closed in and around the bazaar. security officers are patrolling the area. anti-government protests are unusual in iran.
-- village was not targeted. president bashar al-assad is -- for the time being, he is not really -- he does not want to see this. the russians and the chinese would not support such a move. it is not in the syrian interest to act in a very aggressive manner. the turks are very nervous. they have seen border violations on several occasions. let's not forget that back in june, two planes were shot down by the syrians. the turks are very nervous about these developments. >> are you saying that the situation will likely not escalate? >> i do not think the situation will escalate for the time being. neither side is interested in escalation. of course, turkey is using very strong language. that is a matter of national honor, so to speak. but these revenge attacks we have seen carried out by turkey on syrian territory today helps cool down the mood. neither side is really wishing to see a further deterioration of the situation. for this reason, you will see a calming down of the situation. >> do you think what happened in turkey could be used by nato as a pretext for getting involved in the confli
border attacks. the remark by anders is seen as a warning to bashar al-assad to immediately halt the mortar attacks. >> obviously turkey has a right to defend herself. we have all necessary plans in place to protect and defend turkey. >> rasmussen said that a political solution is the best way to stop the conflict in syria. he called on turkey to show restraint. nato views an attack against a member country as an attack on the alliance as a whole. its members can jointly defend the country. until now nato leaders have repeatedly denied the possibility of military intervention in syria. they have said it could destabilize the rejn. region. >>> the international energy agency predicts iraq's oil production will more than double by 2020 from the current level. the iea made a forecast in a report released on tuesday. the report says that iraq will likely produce 6.1 million barrels of oil a day by 2020. iraq has signed many contracts with international oil companies. the country has been making progress and reconstruction since the u.s. led war. the iea also projects by 2035 iraq's d
because, as you know, the rebels are demanding assad has to leave. >> yeah. >> rose: and they're not willing apparently, to have much political conversations until that happens. >> yeah, but my point is that for the first time an international gathering agreed on a process, an international meeting including russia agreed on a process leading to a transition in syria. my point is that could serve as the basis for an international response through the u.n. security council. you asked me what could i recommend. >> rose: right, right. >> that's what i could recommend. and, of course, if the parties involved did not comply with that binding resolution, it should have some consequences. it's not for me to elaborate on which consequences. but i do believe that the whole international community has a responsibility to prevent what i see as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think t
transfer the chemical weapons to hezbollah. i think that's a significant red line. if the assad forces were to do that, i think that would precipitate much bigger crisis and draw from the united states. barring that or major attack on turkey, i think we're in a gruesome ugly stalemate. dagen: for how long? >> it could drag on for a year, two years, yes. connell: we mentioned at the top the impact on the presidential election here in the united states would be. you think it will be kind of status quo through november and beyond. >> i think so. again, providing the rebels with things like shoulder fire missiles that could take down the government's helicopter gunships, that would be potentially a game changer, but barring that, if we don't up the supply to the rebels they have enough to stay in the game but not enough to do a big kill on the assad government. dagen: what about the overall picture for oil production in the middle east? i mean you mentioned the outlook for iraq. but are we in this area where you think we'll be at $90 a barrel for months and months, maybe even years? >> you know
where more than 30,000 men, women and children have been massacred by assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked and the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan including the kill of usama bin laden. these are real achievements won at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force however in yemen and somalia, in libya, and other parts of north africa, in iraq and now in syria and other extremists have gained ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight but they are no substitute for a national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding and i want to believe him as much as anyone else but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destablize the region and with vio
and it is distinctions that give us the complexity we need to understand the world and assad ran a brutal dictatorship but nothing like saddam hussein. i had my passport taken by the iraqi authorities when i was in iraq -- i was very nervous obviously. i only got back to the airport before i left. i was a journalist who got too close to my story and i was intent on eliminating saddam hussein. i believed like the lot of people, different western countries in the world and on both sides of the aisle that there were wm ds and i believe a regime this suffocatingly brutal you couldn't trust. you had to assume that it existed and the work turned out so miserably. had we had different generals and different strategy could have been different. you can't simply say it wouldn't have mattered no matter what we did but on the other hand a lot of the mistakes we made were implicit in the hubris of the conception because we can play counterfact wills all we want but at the end of the day you are stuck with the fact you have and you have to live with them and deal with them. >> you add up the costs. almost 5,000 ame
iraq supporting bashar al assad. in afghanistan because we tell them we're leaving, we now have this terrible afghan-on-american shooting, and all the president says is -- we are leaving, we are withdrawing. the iranians don't think we're serio serious because we spend our time selling israelis not to attack. the most shameful thing in american history in syria, while 30,000 people are massacred there, the iranians have people on the ground and the massacre goes on. everything they said would happen if we intervened has now happened because we didn't intervene, including rising influence of al qaeda in syria. it's terrible, it's disgraceful, and it's feckless and it is a president who believes in leading from behind. >> senator mccain, thank you very much for joining us. we hope you'll come back and join us again soon. >> any time. >>> we have called the white house to invite them to put a representative on to talk about either of the two jobs stories we just covered. we have not heard back. but we've got a guy who's really just as good on it. jared bernstein, former advisor to
because no longer is it the rebels on one side wanting president assad gone and the government on the other side continuing to fight its own people. this group of extremists that has now come on means, jon, if in the future assad does decide to leave power, the civil war could easily continue between the rebels where local syrians want a better life for themselves and their country and the jihadists who clearly want an islamic state inside syria. jon, back to you. jon: leland vittert, thank you. jenna: flying dragon now on its way to international space station. remaining on course despite a problem with an engine. the game of changing mission and what happened specifically with that engine. what went wrong there? >>> plus, a mission in the other direction. right now a daredevil sky diver is getting ready the to jump from a balloon 23 miles above the earth. why, you ask? we'll tell you next. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you c
. this is the argument that it's american strength that's provocative. what happens is whether it's the assad regime in syria or the ayatollahs in tehran. they look at a weak and inattentive president and recalibrate their policies to take advantage that weakness. those are what the concerns should be. megyn: president obama's reelection team ramming up their attacks on mitt romney. calling him dishonest, untruthful and coming out and saying he's a liar. sarah jones gave up her nfl cheerleading job to become a teacher. now she is a criminal defendant and about to make a plea after having sex with a teenaged student. now that federal government launched a program to fine hospitals if some patients return within 30 days of being released, we are going to speak to a doctor about how those fines might affect patient care. and everyone bottom line. >> we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it away from the fog of the controversy. [ mujahid ] there was a little bit of trepidation, not quite knowing what the next phase was going to be, you know, because you been, you know, this is what you
and libya and later on probably when assad falls in syria, the whole discussion is going to be within the all-encompassing islamist family. and the people i supported, you know, democrats with small d, the reformers, the progressives, the secularists are going to be watching with frustration. they did a lousy job in the elections in egypt and other places because like i remember in my youth in 1968, we were happy with the student movements in spain and in paris and this and that, you know? we had long hair, and we ruse used to drink and think about the future and demonstrate in the streets, and that's changed. in egypt i love them, they're like my kids. they demonstrated, they didn't do retail politics. they didn't know what organization means. they didn't understand, you know, that politics is coalition. so now the islamists are at the helm. i'll say this, and my last point. what happened recently after that video and the reaction in egypt and benghazi -- benghazi's an act of terror, we know that, but let's talk about egypt. demonstrations in the rest of the arab world and the muslim
's leader, president bashar al assad. and the other thing that mitt romney will pledge to do in this speech later this morning is reverse some of those steep defense cuts that are part of that fiscal cliff that is looming at the end of the year. and here is one excerpt from the speech that we'll be hearing from mitt romney later on this morning. it goes after a chief theme of president obama. not only over his presidency but over his first campaign. here it is. it says, quote, i know the president hopes for a safer, freer and more prosperous middle east allied with the united states. i share this hope. but hope is not a strategy. we cannot support our friends and defeat our enemies in the middle east when our words are not backed up by deeds, when our defense spending is being arbitrarily and deeply cut, when we have no trade agenda to speak of and the perception of our strategy is not one of partnership, but of passivity. soledad, yesterday some of his senior foreign policy advisers had a conference call with reporters. they were sort of laying out some presidencies of past that they think
to fight bashar al-assad's oppression of them. one by one he'll go down and argue that barack obama and the obama administration have been quote, leading from behind and essentially passive in american foreign policy, and in that vane have relinquished the u.s. role of strength and security and moral leadership around the world. patti ann: carl, do you see a change in mitt romney's approach to foreign policy, as far as the campaign goes? >> reporter: well, the attack on the consulate in benghazi now more than three weeks ago, the romney campaign has been saying since that point that there would be a major foreign policy speech delivered and that it would be quite critical of president obama. but the truth is, his primary emphasis, romney's is jobs and the economy. they are making sure that he has got all the presidential issues, commander-in-chief being obviously a key one touched on, and there is in issue of questions about his foreign policy experience. he's a one-term governor of massachusetts and the obama campaign is out with a new ad that will run only in virginia but it's ver
for the removal from power of president assad of syria, and again, without supplying them arms or helping the rebels and have clearly put ourselves on the cause of the rebels there. not to mention almost the entire leadership of al-qaeda is gone. they have been targeted and killed by the obama administration. osama bin laden no longer is a threat to the united states and neither is moammar gadhafi. and iran is nowhere closer to getting a nuclear weapon than they were before president obama took office. and america's prestige is up all over the world. the most popular person in europe today is barack obama. so people look differently and more kindly and more as a friend and partner to the united states than they ever did under george bush and dick cheney. i think this president has made a huge contribution in lifting the united states in the eyes of the world, and we are safer today than we ever were under george bush and dick cheney. 866-55-press, what do you say. >> announcer: radio meets telejigs. the "bill press show" now on current tv. of this democracy and see your
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)